September 17, 1985Dear Mike:This morning’s papers carried

September 17, 1985Dear Mike:This morning’s papers carried suggestions that Apple is considering removing me as Chairman. I don’t know the source of these reports but they are both misleading to the public and unfair to me.

You will recall that at last Thursday’s Board meeting I stated I had decided to start a new venture and I tendered my resignation as Chairman.

“The best thing ever to happen to Steve is when we fired him, told him to get lost,” Arthur Rock later said. The theory, shared by many, is that the tough love made him wiser and more mature. But it’s not that simple. At the

company he founded after being ousted from Apple, Jobs was able to indulge all of his instincts, both good and bad. He was unbound. The result was a series of spectacular products that were dazzling market flops. This was the

true learning experience. What prepared him for the great success he would have in Act III was not his ouster from his Act I at Apple but his brilliant failures in Act II.

The Board declined to accept my resignation and asked me to defer it for a week. I agreed to do so in light of the

encouragement the Board offered with regard to the proposed new venture and the indications that Apple would

invest in it. On Friday, after I told John Sculley who would be joining me, he confirmed Apple’s willingness to discuss areas of possible collaboration between Apple and my new venture.

Subsequently the Company appears to be adopting a hostile posture toward me and the new venture. Accordingly, I must insist upon the immediate acceptance of my resignation. . . .

As you know, the company’s recent reorganization left me with no work to do and no access even to regular management reports. I am but 30 and want still to contribute and achieve.

After what we have accomplished together, I would wish our parting to be both amicable and dignified.

Yours sincerely, steven p. jobs

When a guy from the facilities team went to Jobs’s office to pack up his belongings, he saw a picture frame on the floor. It

contained a photograph of Jobs and Sculley in warm conversation, with an inscription from seven months earlier: “Here’s to Great Ideas, Great Experiences, and a Great

Friendship! John.” The glass frame was shattered. Jobs had hurled it across the room

before leaving.

From that day,

he never spoke to

Sculley again.

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While a student in McCollum’s class, Jobs became friends with

While a student in McCollum’s class, Jobs became friends with a graduate who was the teacher’s
all-time favorite and a school legend for his wizardry in the class. Stephen Wozniak, whose younger
brother had been on a swim team with Jobs, was almost five years older than Jobs and far more
knowledgeable about electronics. But emotionally and socially he was still a high school geek.

 

Like Jobs, Wozniak learned a lot at his father’s knee. But their lessons were different.
Paul Jobs was a high school dropout who, when fixing up cars, knew how to turn a tidy
profit by striking the right deal on parts. Francis Wozniak, known as Jerry,

was a brilliant
engineering graduate from Cal Tech, where he had quarterbacked the football team, who became
a rocket scientist at Lockheed. He exalted engineering and looked down on those in business,
marketing, and sales. “I remember him telling me that engineering was the highest level of
importance you could reach in the world,” Steve Wozniak later recalled. “It takes society to a new level.”

One of Steve Wozniak’s first memories was going to his father’s workplace on a weekend
and being shown electronic parts, with his dad “putting them on a table with me so I got to play with them.” He watched with fascination as his father tried to get a waveform line on a video screen to stay flat so he could show that one of his circuit designs was working properly. “I could see that whatever my dad was doing, it was important and good.” Woz, as he was known even then, would ask about the resistors and transistors lying around the house, and his father would pull out a blackboard to illustrate what they did. “He would explain what a resistor was by going all the way back to atoms and electrons. He explained how resistors worked when I was in second grade, not by equations but by having me picture it.”

Woz’s father taught him something else that became ingrained in his childlike, socially awkward personality: Never lie. “My dad believed in honesty. Extreme honesty. That’s the biggest thing he taught me. I never lie, even to this day.” (The only partial exception was in the service of a good practical joke.) In addition, he imbued his son with an aversion to extreme ambition, which set Woz apart from Jobs. At an Apple product launch event in 2010, forty years after they met, Woz reflected on their differences. “My father told me, ‘You always want to be in the middle,’” he said. “I didn’t want to be up with the high-level people like Steve. My dad was an engineer,

and that’s what
I wanted to be. I was way
too shy ever to be a
business leader like Steve.”
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When I learned you were a strong supporter of the Throne,

“How long it is since we last saw each other!”

replied Lu Bu, bowing in return.

“And where are you now?”

“I am a general in the Imperial Tiger Army.

When I learned you were a strong supporter of the Throne,

I could not say how I rejoiced.

I have come now to present to you a really fine horse,

a five-hundred-mile-a-day horse,

one that crosses rivers and goes up mountains as if they

were the level plain. Its name is Red Hare.

It will be a fitting aid to your valor.”

Lu Bu bade his guards lead out the horse.

It was of a uniform color like glowing-sun

red——not a hair of another color.

It measured ten spans from head to tail and from

hoof to neck eight spans. When it neighed,

the sound filled the empyrean and shook the ocean.

[hip, hip, hip] Mark ye the steed swift and tireless,

see the dust, spurned by his hoofs, rising in clouds,

Now it swims the river, anon climbs the hill,

rending the purple mist asunder,

Scornful it breaks the rein, shakes from its head

the jeweled bridle, It is as a fiery

dragon descending from the highest heaven. [yip, yip, yip]

  Lu Bu was delighted with the horse and said,

“What return can I hope to make for such a creature?”

“What return can I hope for?

I came to you out of a sense of what is right,” replied Li Su.

Wine was brought in and they drank.

“We have seen very little of each other,

but I am constantly meeting your honorable father,” said Li Su.

“You are drunk,” said Lu Bu. “My father has been dead for years.”

“Not so; I spoke of Ding Yuan, the man of the day.”

Lu Bu started. “Yes, I am with him, but only because I can do no better.”

“Sir, your talent is higher than the heavens, deeper than the seas.

Who in all the world does not bow before your name?

Fame and riches and honors are yours for the taking.

And you say you can do no better than remain a subordinate!”

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